Tag Archives: Art

POV Brings a “Rare Bird” to Television

Think about the most stylish people you know. How many of them have had the contents of their closets on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, or inspired a line of MAC makeup? Have they been a visiting professor at a major university, admired by Alexander Wang and Kanye West or sold a shoe and jewelry collection on the Home Shopping Network – all after age 90?

That’s Iris Apfel, the subject of this week’s POV – simply titled Iris. You may not know the name, but once you see her, she’s hard to forget. Continue reading POV Brings a “Rare Bird” to Television

Meet This Year's WPT Auction Commemorative Artist

Ann Fischer Athas
Ann Fischer Athas

Art items created by artists from around the state will be available throughout Auction, May 27-31, including the work of Ann Fischer Athas, the 2015 Auction Commemorative Artist.

Ask Ann Fischer Athas to name her proudest artistic achievement and she won’t boast, even though her creations are remarkable. Instead she’ll cite the fact that she keeps producing. “Just when you think you’ve found something you like to do in printmaking, you find a million more things to explore,” she says.

Fischer Athas consistently turns her concepts into realities by producing one-of-a-kind prints often inspired by nature. Printmaking is a technical, step-intensive art form that has deep roots. Many printmaking techniques date back to the 1600s. The commemorative piece Fischer Athas has donated to Auction, titled “Winter on the Farm, February, 2015,” was created using the intaglio method, which is the exact opposite of a relief print. For this piece, the image was incised into the surface of the plate using acid, and the etched area held the ink prior to transfer.

Winter on the Farm, February, 2015

Like the origins of printmaking, Fischer Athas’ love of printmaking runs deep. She first experimented with printmaking while working on her B.A. at Knox College. After graduating with a degree in art, she worked as a graphic designer in marketing for years, until a move to Wisconsin brought printmaking back into her life.

After relocating, Fischer Athas heard about a printmaking class offered by UW-Extension and decided she wanted to try the medium again. So the then stay-at-home mom hired a babysitter for her daughters and headed back to the studio for the first time in years.

“I thought, ‘do it now or you’re never going to do it,’” she reflects. Looking back, she recognizes that decision as a pivotal moment in her life. She has now been making prints for more than 20 years.

“One of the things that’s interesting about the printmaking tradition is the collaboration between artists and printers,” she explains.

That rapport is showcased by the donated piece, which was created through collaboration between Fischer Athas and Master Printer Andrew Balkin, with Balkin serving as the printer for the edition.

To learn more about Fischer Athas’ prints, visit
www.athasprintstudio.com.

Be sure to join us for this year’s Auction, May 27-31 as we celebrate our 40th year of fantastic fun! Help support Wisconsin Public Television as you bid on an array of goods and services donated by businesses and individuals from around Wisconsin and beyond. For details, visit auction.wpt.org.

7 Ways to Engage Your Creative Children

I love that my daughter loves art and music, and I’ve dedicated a large part of our fairly small house to art supplies and her projects. I also know that how I respond to my daughter’s creations affects her deeply. Courtesy of PBS Parents, Patti Saraniero at ArtsEdge.org gives us seven suggestions about how parents can talk with their kids about their creative work.

1. Be thoughtful.
Your young artist has put effort into his work. Generic praise that we all use —“that’s great, honey”—gives us away that we aren’t really looking or listening. It can be discouraging. On the flip side, highlighting a weak spot in the artwork can also undermine a young artist. Often your artist is aware of where the artwork doesn’t work as well. If your young actor cannot be heard from the stage, encourage him to talk about what he is doing well and what he wants to continue to work on. When your actor identifies that he needs to better project his voice, offer to help. If he says no, accept that, but be willing to lend a hand when your child is ready for your help.

2. Don’t take over.
For parents who have a special ability or interest in the child’s art area, it can be tempting to “help.” Hold on. Let your child find her own way and wait for her to invite your participation. For example, let’s say the theater has been a very important part of your own

childhood and adulthood. It makes sense that you would want your children to enjoy it, too. So absolutely take your kids to the theater. Speak to them afterward about the experience, and let them know that you are willing to take them again.

3. Get beyond yes and no.
Use open-ended questions that encourage your child to discuss or explain his work. Listen closely to what he says. Try asking “Tell me about your sculpture” rather than “What is that?” Questions such as “What was your inspiration for this song?” encourage young artists to articulate their artistic thinking and process. The arts offer a valuable opportunity for children and teens to practice self-reflection.

4. Teach to learn.
Ask your young artist to teach you about the arts concepts and skills she learned to create the artwork. Teaching is a great way to reinforce learning and build mastery. What kid doesn’t love the opportunity to show an adult how something is done?

5. Encourage the process.
The artistic product is what you see at the end of your child’s hard work. The process of creating the work is as valuable as the product—and, for many kids, more so. When producing a piece of art, student artists must create, revise, polish, and persevere. All of these experiences are useful both in and outside of the arts. Music, dance, and theater rehearsals are great opportunities for your artist to practice not only the art form but also collaboration, compromise, and patience.

6. Effort counts.
Not every artistic product will be perfect (or even “good”). Interestingly, it may be the effort put into creating it that matters more in the end. In each of the arts, there are technical skills that need to be developed. Not every child may be artistically gifted, but with education and practice, every child can develop artistic skills. Encourage practice. Remember the old joke, “How do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice, practice, practice…”? The reason the joke still works is because practice matters!

7. Let their light shine.
Find ways for your child to share his work if he chooses to. With visual artwork, encourage your child to photograph his work to create a digital “catalog” of his accomplishments. Videos and recordings of performing artworks also allow student artists to “collect” their body of work.Parents are an artist’s first and often unabashedly best audience. Whether your young artist has career aspirations in the arts or not, your support, interest, and commitment underscore the importance of her artistic work and viewpoint. Remember, the arts are valuable ways for kids to make sense of life and the world. You can further illuminate the way for them.

For more articles about kids and the arts, visit pbs.org/parents.

Meet the Egg Lady of Egg Harbor

Today’s Wisconsin Life sneak peek is egg-ceptional!

We’re sure that Door County artist Kathleen Beck has heard every egg pun possible. But, that’s what comes with a life devoted to making art with eggs! Venture into the artist’s studio to discover the wide array of opportunities this unique medium offers. We think her work is really egg-citing!

Discover more Wisconsin Life here tomorrow and on-air Monday nights in February on Wisconsin Public Television!

Love – and Art – Know No Bounds

Love knows no bounds. But, in our second exclusive Wisconsin Life video segment, two artists explain how their craft drew them together from thousands of miles apart to forge a lasting creative – and loving – relationship in Jacksonport. Enjoy their story and check back tomorrow for another taste of Wisconsin Life as we look forward to the February broadcast premiere!

Dr. Albert C. Barnes' Art Collection

Watch The Barnes Collection at 7 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 5 on Wisconsin Public Television.

There’s nothing quite like amassing a nice collection of art, especially if you can boast a collection larger than most museums. Of course for most of us, bankruptcy would probably be the final piece of the collection.

Controversy aside, it’s amazing that one man could acquire so many pieces of art that years later would bring together so many brilliant minds to develop the Barnes Foundation campus. It’s really a shame that more effort doesn’t go into preserving art, but lately it seems to be a struggle just to keep the arts tradition alive.

Is it that we’ve grown to care less and less about the arts over the years? Or perhaps the definition has become so broad that it envelops more than we as a society can maintain? What do you think? Are the finer arts making a comeback or are they doomed to only being remembered in history books?

True Art Collectors

Watch Independent Lens “Herb and Dorothy” at 9:00 p.m. Friday, Jan. 28 on Wisconsin Public Television.

For more than 50 years they’ve been married, and for over 50 years, they have collected art.  Meet Herb and Dorothy Vogel, avid art collectors with quite an impressive collection.  From paintings the size of a wall to twisted wire a bits of string, the Vogels appreciate all art and buy the pieces they can not live without.  This is particularly interesting to me because I really don’t understand people with an eye for art.  I’ve spent many hours at some of the museums throughout Wisconsin, some things are beautiful, some historic, but there are always a few pieces that look like junk.  It’s amazing to see art through the eyes of Herb and Dorothy because they truly understand and appreciate each piece.  Enjoy the preview below and start to learn a little bit about Herb and Dorthy, the art they collect and the people who know them best.