Tag Archives: writing

The Great American Read: Michael Perry shares his picks

It’s here! Tune in 7 p.m. tonight for the fall kickoff episode of The Great American ReadThere’s plenty of action to come, both on TV and in our continuing series of Wisconsin authors.

Author Michael Perry smiles and wears a plaid shirt.Today we present WPT/WPR favorite and The New York Times bestselling essayist Michael Perry, of New Auburn. The paperback of his latest book, Montaigne in Barn Boots, will be released by HarperPerennial in November while he is on tour with his band the Long Beds.

Read more to find out which books have encouraged Perry to question his assumptions about writing and life.

Continue reading The Great American Read: Michael Perry shares his picks

The Great American Read: Jerry Apps shares his picks

We’re getting closer to the Fall Kick Off episode of The Great American Read: airing 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept.  11. Have you voted on the list yet? If you’re stuck – as we are! – why not check out some more picks by Wisconsin writers?

Today we bring you the prolific, the folksy, the one and only Jerry Apps. He’s a WPT favorite for good reason: adept at memoir writing, storytelling, history, teaching and more, he keeps readers busy turning out new and sometimes unexpected stories at a blistering pace.

A person stares into a frozen wave of water.His latest, Cold as Thunder, is a dystopian novel set in a frozen wasteland where only “a resourceful band of Wisconsin sixty-somethings calling themselves the Oldsters” have the knowledge to fight the ruling regime.

Read more to find out which books have helped this beloved author think about writing!

Continue reading The Great American Read: Jerry Apps shares his picks

Theodore Roosevelt – America's Real Renaissance Man

“He’s the writing-est president in American history, by far… He’s an intellectual. He read a book a day, sometimes three books in a day if he had some leisure. We think of Jefferson as America’s renaissance man, but it’s really Theodore Roosevelt.” – historian Clay Jenkinson.

From sharing tall tales with anyone who would listen to eating a dozen eggs each morning, wrestling with diplomats and boxing with aides, Theodore Roosevelt might have also been our most interesting president.  Watch this sneak peek clip into his fascinating life from Ken Burns’ The Roosevelts: An Intimate Portrait. Then, tune in to the seven-part documentary airing seven consecutive nights at 7 starting Sunday on Wisconsin Public Television.